SWAG uses Cookies: by using this site we shall tailor content for our respective viewers.

Click to Hide Notification

Click to Show Notification
Swag Online Mens MagazineSwag Online Mens Magazine

ARTICLES > AUTOS


EVERYTHING YOU'VE EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT CAR COLOURS

Tags:   Cars,   Motoring

By The Swag Team   -  December 31, 2014


   Cars malta,  Motoring malta,  EVERYTHING YOU'VE EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT CAR  COLOURS malta, Autos malta, Swag Mens Online Magazine Malta

Photo credit:  www.camarocarplace.com


Thinking of ushering in the New Year with a new car? The type of colour you choose for your vehicle can tell the world a lot about your personality and what type of driver you are. SWAG reveals all on the subject.

There are plenty of stories about green cars being unlucky and racy ladies driving red motors – but studies show that colour does project certain expectations about cars and their drivers. 

 

Black cars are more likely to be involved in crashes than any other, a British survey has shown. But it is not a problem with the colour – just the personalities of the people who choose it.

 

British insurers Churchill found that drivers picking black often have aggressive streaks. The company analysed 130,000 accident claims. They found that the highest proposition involved black vehicles. Silver was the second most likely colour to crash. Light coloured cars were in the fewest accidents.

 

Here’s the research car colour personality chart, followed by some common questions answered.

 

 

BLACK

 

Success-driven, ambitious, interested in status symbols. An aggressive personality, an outsider or rebel. 

 

BLUE

 

You’re a team player, sociable but perhaps lacking in imagination, introspective, and cautious. Metallic blue is popular but not dark blue. 

 

WHITE

 

Methodical, but distant. Often driven by status-seeking extroverts. White cars are more common in sunny climates like ours because they reflect heat better.

 

YELLOW

 

Sunny, boy-racer personality… idealistic and lovers of novelty. But take care: in Australia, you’re apparently more likely to have a head-on crash in a yellow car.

 

GREEN

 

Class-conscious, traditional in outlook, not exactly original. Possibly drivers are prone to have hysterical tendencies. British racing green is a smart choice for classic MGs, if not much else.

 

BEIGE/BROWN

 

Unadventurous, safe on the road. Hard to sell, so best to avoid unless you want to keep the car for life.

 

RED

 

Outgoing, impulsive, energetic, quick-thinking with zest and creative. A good colour to pretend you’re in a Ferrari.

 

GREY/SILVER

 

Stylish, cool, aloof, successful, possibly a little pompous. But as long as it’s got a metallic finish, you’re on to a winner. 

 

 

When it comes to a car’s resale value, there is more to paint than meets the eye:

 

When could being colour blind cost me money?

 

When you are choosing the colour of your next car. Get it wrong and your car will depreciate rapidly. Bright metallic and the new pearlescent finishes are worth more than non-metallics, dark colours such as so-called “doom blue” and wacky shades designed simply to boost flagging sales. The difference in value can be more than the paint’s price as a new option. A dark blue BMW series could be worth €700 less than one in a bright metallic, and a non-metallic Jaguar XJ6 at least €1,500 less.

 

Which models suit which colours?

 

Tricky one, this. BMW Z3s look great in silver but the rumour is there are too many in that colour so prices are less firm than for cars in less popular shades. Ironically, it may pay you to avoid buying the most popular colour. Prestige car suit sober metallic and pale blues and pale blues and silvers but it is vital the interior colour is a good contrast. People carriers should be in bright colours but avoid white. It makes the car look like a commercial vehicle and emphasise its bulk. Mainstream famly cars should be in bright colours but beware fashion-sensitive pastel shades.

 

Any new colours to watch out for?

 

Nissan has a colour called Mystic Green available on just 300 Primera GTs. It’s a “chromaflair” colour that changes with the light from green to purple. It’s a good attention raiser but is sure to harm resale value because it is a nightmare to respray.

 

What should I look for if my car is repainted?

 

Overspray on window rubbers where the garage hasn’t masked the area properly. Dealers have an eagle eye and will pay less for a repainted car. Also check for swirls due to excessive use of the mechanical polisher and streaks due to an inexperienced sprayer or incorrect thinner ratio. New cars can be just as badly affected, so before you pay check the finish.



WE RECOMMEND

   Music malta,  DJs malta,  Entertainment  malta,  DJ FOCUS: POCCI malta, Entertainment malta, Swag Mens Online Magazine Malta

DJ FOCUS: POCCI

   Music malta,  Heavy malta,  Metal Over Malta malta,  Metal Over Malta 2016 malta, Lifestyle malta, Swag Mens Online Magazine Malta

METAL OVER MALTA 2016

   Babes malta,  Women malta,  Lingerie malta,  Incoming: The Piccinino Babe Squad malta, Women malta, Swag Mens Online Magazine Malta

INCOMING: THE PICCININO BABE SQUAD




comments powered by Disqus

SWAG POLL

WAS STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS WORTH THE WAIT ?

Yes - The Force was strong with this One

53 %

No - Even Han Solo couldn't save them

47 %

  • Yes - The Force was strong with this One
  • No - Even Han Solo couldn't save them

SWAG ON FACEBOOK

Terms & Conditions





74a2a48b743ea63652d23305e338b04a-5f019dbb35511

Enter Email and Password to Sign in SWAG Online Men’s Magazine

Session:

Email Address:

Password: